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Representations of the Phallus within “The L Word

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judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

Bodies That Matter On the Discursive Limits of Sex 1st. 6/11/2011 · “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary”–Here Butler argues that the material and the discursive are not separate: language is material and the material cannot escape the process of signification. Butler draws on Freud, Kristeva, and Lacan to argue that the lesbian phallus is a “useful fiction” because it dissociates the phallus from the penis in a way that reaffirms but, Certainly Butler's "lesbian phallusn is a radical concept that disrupts the heteroscxism of psychoanalysis, but it does not upset the symbolic division between a complex.

Bodies That Matter On the Discursive Limits of Sex 1st

No Relation to Rhett academia.org. In "Bodies that Matter", Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in "Gender Trouble", Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex and, Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature and the Co-director of the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is presently the recipient of the Andrew Mellon Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement in the ….

On the subject of lesbianism, Butler later writes that “Insofar as the phallus is an idealization of morphology, it produces a necessary effect of inadequation, one which, in the cultural context of lesbian relations, can be quickly assimilated to the sense of an inadequate derivation from the supposedly real thing, and, hence, a source of shame.” ler’s essay “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in 2 her 1993 book, Bodies that Matter.³ As one of the most influential pio- 3 neers of queer theory, Butler revised Lacanian psychoanalysis; in 4 turn, her work inspired cultural studies scholar Judith (Jack)⁴ Halber- 5 stam, whose 1998 book Female Masculinity depicts types of women who 6 exemplify Butler’s abstract

The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" begins by waggishly disclaiming its own suggestiveness. We must not, Judith Butler tells us, expect the essay to live up to the temptations of its name; "after such a promising title," she says, "I knew I could not possibly give a satisfying paper." Paul B. Preciado, The Contrasexual Manifesto (English extract) Judith Butler, ‘The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary’ , pages 57-65. If you don’t manage to complete all the reading, do still feel free to attend.

The Judith Butler reader / edited by Sara Salih, with Judith Butler. In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body.

There is a struggle between the penis and the phallus, insofar as “the phallus not only opposes the penis in a logical sense, but is itself instituted through the repudiation of its partial, decentered, and substitutable character” (Butler 84). Judith Butler, née le 24 février 1956 à Cleveland, est une philosophe américaine, professeure à l'Université Berkeley depuis 1993. Une thématique importante de sa réflexion est celle de la vulnérabilité.

In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. Butler offers a brilliant reworking of the body, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” In Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’,” New York: Routledge. Butler, Judith. 2006.

Jeg har samme følelse som Butler selv, når hun i 1993 skriver et essay om ”den lesbiske fallos” (”The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary”) og … 2 All books are available locally for purchase at SBX Book Exchange only at 1806 N. High St. 1. The Judith Butler Reader 2. Excitable Speech 3.

On the subject of lesbianism, Butler later writes that “Insofar as the phallus is an idealization of morphology, it produces a necessary effect of inadequation, one which, in the cultural context of lesbian relations, can be quickly assimilated to the sense of an inadequate derivation from the supposedly real thing, and, hence, a source of shame.” In Gender Trouble, Judith Butler explores Freud's and Lacan's discussions of the symbolic phallus by pointing out the connection between the phallus and the penis. She writes, "The law requires conformity to its own notion of 'nature'. It gains its legitimacy through the binary and asymmetrical naturalization of bodies in which the phallus, though clearly not identical to the penis, deploys

The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary 3. Phantasmatic Idenitigication and the Assumption of Sex 4. Gender Is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion PART TWO 5. "Dangerous Crossing": Willa Cather's Masculine Names 6. Passing, Queering: Nella Larsen's Psychoanalytic Challenge 7. Arguing with the Real 8. Critically Queer Butler, J (1993) The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary. In: Butler, J (eds) Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex, New York : Routledge , pp. 57 – 91 . Google Scholar

The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary, in Judith Butler,Bodies that Matter: on the discursive limits of ‘sex’, New York and London: Routledge, 1993, pp. 57-92. [5] Parveen Adams’ description of her lesbian sadomasochist, op cit., pp. 262-3. Butler,’Judith, ’Bodies%that Many’selfAidentified’ lesbians,’gay men,’bisexuals,’ and transgenders,’ moreover,’object’to’the’word,’“queer.”’Somearguethat’it’has’an’implicit’masculine’bias,’like’ the’word,’“gay,”’before’it;’others’findit’anugly’term’of’derogation;’still’others’see’it’as’too inclusive,’ dee

“The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” In Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’,” New York: Routledge. Butler, Judith. 2006. Jeg har samme følelse som Butler selv, når hun i 1993 skriver et essay om ”den lesbiske fallos” (”The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary”) og …

6/11/2011 · “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary”–Here Butler argues that the material and the discursive are not separate: language is material and the material cannot escape the process of signification. Butler draws on Freud, Kristeva, and Lacan to argue that the lesbian phallus is a “useful fiction” because it dissociates the phallus from the penis in a way that reaffirms but "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler „There is no gender identity behind the expressions of gender; that identity is performatively …

Certainly Butler's "lesbian phallusn is a radical concept that disrupts the heteroscxism of psychoanalysis, but it does not upset the symbolic division between a complex Perhaps the promise of phallus is always dissatisfying in some way. Judith Butler — "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler

Bodies That Matter Butler Judith Libro Routledge 04. Judith Butler. 1993. “The Lesbian Phalus and the Morphological Imaginary” In 1993. “The Lesbian Phalus and the Morphological Imaginary” In Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’,” New York: Routledge., “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” (1993), later published in: The Judith Butler Reader 2004. Gender is a kind of imitation for which there is no original; in fact, it is a kind of imitation that produces the very notion of the original as an effect and consequence of the imitation itself..

Judith ButlerovГЎ citГЎty (14 citГЎtЕЇ) CitГЎty slavnГЅch

judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

La rhГ©torique – Rhetoricity The Rhetoric of Bodies. — Judith Butler "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler, Butler states in chapter two of Bodies that Matter entitled “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” that, “…from the metonymic trajectory of Freud’s own text, the ambivalence at the center of any construction of the phallus belongs to no body part, but is fundamentally transferable…” (Butler 32)..

judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

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judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

Healing Bell and 100 Words Dr Catherine Harper. In her essay ‘The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary’, Judith Butler (1993 Butler, J. 1993. Bodies that matter. On the discursive limits of ‘sex’ , London and New York : Routledge . There is a struggle between the penis and the phallus, insofar as “the phallus not only opposes the penis in a logical sense, but is itself instituted through the repudiation of its partial, decentered, and substitutable character” (Butler 84)..

judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf


Judith Butler, née le 24 février 1956 à Cleveland, est une philosophe américaine, professeure à l'Université Berkeley depuis 1993. Une thématique importante de sa réflexion est celle de la vulnérabilité. Gender as Performance An Interview with Judith Butler ludithButlerteaches in the Rhetoric Department at the University of California, Berkeley. Her first book, Subjects of Desire:

Another text that forms an important backdrop for my reading of Wetlands is Judith Butler’s “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in which the phallus, specifically the The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary (1993) The force of fantasy : Mapplethorpe, feminism, and discursive excess (1990) Endangered/endangering : schematic racism …

Another text that forms an important backdrop for my reading of Wetlands is Judith Butler’s “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in which the phallus, specifically the Lacanian Another text that forms an important backdrop for my reading of Wetlands is Judith Butler’s “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in which the phallus, specifically the

In ‘The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary’, Butler installs/restores the trope of the Phallus by introducing the more ‘interesting than satisfying’ (Butler, 1993: 57) lesbian phallus. The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary 3. Phantasmatic Idenitigication and the Assumption of Sex 4. Gender Is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion PART TWO 5. "Dangerous Crossing": Willa Cather's Masculine Names 6. Passing, Queering: Nella Larsen's Psychoanalytic Challenge 7. Arguing with the Real 8. Critically Queer

Butler, J (1993) The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary. In: Butler, J (eds) Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex, New York : Routledge , pp. 57 – 91 . Google Scholar Bodies that Matter, “odies that Matter,” “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary,” and “Phantasmatic Identification and the Assumption of Sex.” Student presentations: Judith Butler, Celebrity / Trans.

Another text that forms an important backdrop for my reading of Wetlands is Judith Butler’s “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in which the phallus, specifically the Lacanian In Bodies That Matter, Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in Gender Trouble, Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender.

In Gender Trouble, Judith Butler explores Freud's and Lacan's discussions of the symbolic phallus by pointing out the connection between the phallus and the penis. She writes, "The law requires conformity to its own notion of 'nature'. It gains its legitimacy through the binary and asymmetrical naturalization of bodies in which the phallus, though clearly not identical to the penis, deploys The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary 3. Phantasmatic Idenitigication and the Assumption of Sex 4. Gender Is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion PART TWO 5. "Dangerous Crossing": Willa Cather's Masculine Names 6. Passing, Queering: Nella Larsen's Psychoanalytic Challenge 7. Arguing with the Real 8. Critically Queer

In "Bodies That Matter, " Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in "Gender Trouble, " Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of ler’s essay “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in 2 her 1993 book, Bodies that Matter.³ As one of the most influential pio- 3 neers of queer theory, Butler revised Lacanian psychoanalysis; in 4 turn, her work inspired cultural studies scholar Judith (Jack)⁴ Halber- 5 stam, whose 1998 book Female Masculinity depicts types of women who 6 exemplify Butler’s abstract

Representations of the Phallus within “The L Word

judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies 860 Feminist Theory. — Judith Butler "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler, Butler, J (1993) The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary. In: Butler, J (eds) Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex, New York : Routledge , pp. 57 – 91 . Google Scholar.

Healing Bell and 100 Words Dr Catherine Harper

Quotes By Judith Butler quotes.yourdictionary.com. 4’ Students’with’Disabilities’ ’ In’accordance’with’University’policy’and’the’Americans’with’Disabilities’Act(ADA),’Iwill’, In her essay ‘The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary’, Judith Butler (1993 Butler, J. 1993. Bodies that matter. On the discursive limits of ‘sex’ , London and New York : Routledge ..

Perhaps the promise of phallus is always dissatisfying in some way. Judith Butler — "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler 1/04/2011 · In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. Butler offers a brilliant reworking of the body, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that power operates to constrain sex from the start

In her essay “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary,” (1993) Butler takes Jacques Lacan's phallus theory of human relations to task for being heterosexist. Lacan's theory incorporates the notion of the phallus (a signifier of apparently veiled power or movement but actuality at a deeper level it is a signifier of the veiled desire of the Other). The phallus is not a permanent 6 Judith Butler "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" in Differences. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1992) vol. 4, no. 1, 143. In her essay, Judith Butler refers to Louis Althusser, "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes towards an nvest igationà" Lenin n and Philosophy and Other Essays.

— Judith Butler "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler Judith Butler, née le 24 février 1956 à Cleveland, est une philosophe américaine, professeure à l'Université Berkeley depuis 1993. Une thématique importante de sa réflexion est celle de la vulnérabilité.

"The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler To ask what this means is to miss the point. This sentence beats readers into submission and instructs them that they are in … 6 Judith Butler "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" in Differences. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1992) vol. 4, no. 1, 143. In her essay, Judith Butler refers to Louis Althusser, "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes towards an nvest igationà" Lenin n and Philosophy and Other Essays.

"The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler To ask what this means is to miss the point. This sentence beats readers into submission and instructs them that they are in … In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. Butler offers a brilliant reworking of the body, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that

phallus is an idealization of morphology, it produces a necessary effect of inadequation, one which, in the cultural context of lesbian relations, can be quickly assimilated to the sense of an In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. Butler offers a brilliant reworking of the body, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that power operates to constrain sex

Butler, J (1993) The lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary. In: Butler, J (eds) Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex, New York : Routledge , pp. 57 – 91 . Google Scholar There is a struggle between the penis and the phallus, insofar as “the phallus not only opposes the penis in a logical sense, but is itself instituted through the repudiation of its partial, decentered, and substitutable character” (Butler 84).

In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. The Judith Butler reader / edited by Sara Salih, with Judith Butler.

In Bodies That Matter, Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in Gender Trouble, Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler states in chapter two of Bodies that Matter entitled “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” that, “…from the metonymic trajectory of Freud’s own text, the ambivalence at the center of any construction of the phallus belongs to no body part, but is fundamentally transferable…” (Butler 32).

Althusser, Lacan, Butler and Zizek, concentrating the role of the gaze/gazesand belief in the subject’s psychic economy. I’m especially interested in what role the male hero’s homosexual The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary 3. Phantasmatic Idenitigication and the Assumption of Sex 4. Gender Is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion PART TWO 5. "Dangerous Crossing": Willa Cather's Masculine Names 6. Passing, Queering: Nella Larsen's Psychoanalytic Challenge 7. Arguing with the Real 8. Critically Queer

In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. Butler offers a brilliant reworking of the body, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that power operates to constrain sex with a socially regulative discourse (see Butler’s “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in Bodies That Matter ), is not the subject-to-be turning toward the law already structured

In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. In Gender Trouble, Judith Butler explores Freud's and Lacan's discussions of the symbolic phallus by pointing out the connection between the phallus and the penis. She writes, "The law requires conformity to its own notion of 'nature'. It gains its legitimacy through the binary and asymmetrical naturalization of bodies in which the phallus, though clearly not identical to the penis, deploys

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judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

The Judith Butler reader NOBLE (All Libraries). The Judith Butler reader / edited by Sara Salih, with Judith Butler., “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” (1993), later published in: The Judith Butler Reader 2004. Gender is a kind of imitation for which there is no original; in fact, it is a kind of imitation that produces the very notion of the original as an effect and consequence of the imitation itself..

A Kiss Is Just a Kiss Heterosexuality and Its. The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary, in Judith Butler,Bodies that Matter: on the discursive limits of ‘sex’, New York and London: Routledge, 1993, pp. 57-92. [5] Parveen Adams’ description of her lesbian sadomasochist, op cit., pp. 262-3., Butler states in chapter two of Bodies that Matter entitled “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” that, “…from the metonymic trajectory of Freud’s own text, the ambivalence at the center of any construction of the phallus belongs to no body part, but is fundamentally transferable…” (Butler 32)..

Judith ButlerovГЎ citГЎty (14 citГЎtЕЇ) CitГЎty slavnГЅch

judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

Sensing Botanical Sensoria A Kriya for Cultivating Your. In Bodies That Matter, renowned theorist and philosopher Judith Butler argues that theories of gender need to return to the most material dimension of sex and sexuality: the body. Butler offers a brilliant reworking of the body, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that power operates to constrain sex The Judith Butler reader / edited by Sara Salih, with Judith Butler..

judith butler the lesbian phallus and the morphological imaginary pdf

  • Lecture and Seminar on the theories and work of Paul B
  • Judith Butler Lynne Segal and Peter Osborne Judith
  • Sensing Botanical Sensoria A Kriya for Cultivating Your

  • Judith Butler. 1993. “The Lesbian Phalus and the Morphological Imaginary” In 1993. “The Lesbian Phalus and the Morphological Imaginary” In Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’,” New York: Routledge. “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” In Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’,” New York: Routledge. Butler, Judith. 2006.

    In Bodies That Matter, Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in Gender Trouble, Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Judith Butler, ‘The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary’, Chapter 2, in Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex”’ Final Essay 3,500 …

    ler’s essay “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in 2 her 1993 book, Bodies that Matter.³ As one of the most influential pio- 3 neers of queer theory, Butler revised Lacanian psychoanalysis; in 4 turn, her work inspired cultural studies scholar Judith (Jack)⁴ Halber- 5 stam, whose 1998 book Female Masculinity depicts types of women who 6 exemplify Butler’s abstract The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" begins by waggishly disclaiming its own suggestiveness. We must not, Judith Butler tells us, expect the essay to live up to the temptations of its name; "after such a promising title," she says, "I knew I could not possibly give a satisfying paper."

    Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature and the Co-director of the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is presently the recipient of the Andrew Mellon Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement in the … [2] Judith Butler (1993) Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex,” New York: Routledge. [3] See for example, “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” in Butler…

    Jeg har samme følelse som Butler selv, når hun i 1993 skriver et essay om ”den lesbiske fallos” (”The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary”) og … The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary 3. Phantasmatic Identification and the Assumption of Sex 4. Gender is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion Part 2: 5. 'Dangerous Crossing': Willa Cather's Masculine Names 6. Queering, Passing: Nella Larsen Rewrites Psychoanalysis 7. Arguing with the Real 8. Critically Queer. Notes. Index

    Certainly Butler's "lesbian phallusn is a radical concept that disrupts the heteroscxism of psychoanalysis, but it does not upset the symbolic division between a complex Judith Butler, née le 24 février 1956 à Cleveland, est une philosophe américaine, professeure à l'Université Berkeley depuis 1993. Une thématique importante de sa réflexion est celle de la vulnérabilité.

    Butler states in chapter two of Bodies that Matter entitled “The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary” that, “…from the metonymic trajectory of Freud’s own text, the ambivalence at the center of any construction of the phallus belongs to no body part, but is fundamentally transferable…” (Butler 32). Perhaps the promise of phallus is always dissatisfying in some way. Judith Butler — "The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary" (1993), later published in The Judith Butler Reader (2004) edited by Sarah Salih with Judith Butler

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